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Mod vs push

Old 01-15-2007, 08:17 AM
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Default Mod vs push

I have been more of a truck guy in the past, but I have started to get the itch for more muscle. I am restoring a 1967 Chevelle, and would like to either get an '04 Terminator or hold out till I get "that big raise" and try and get the new Shelby. OK, my question is how does the the Modular engine differ in operation compared to the push rod desgn of the GM motor. I come form a GM household, so I am a little new when it comes to Ford motors.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:31 PM
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I guess no one gives a **** eh...?
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Old 01-23-2007, 03:45 PM
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Anything in specific you want to know? There are major differences between these engines, but most of the differences now lie in the valvetrain.

GM actually uses alot of the technology that Ford introduced on the modular in their LS engines (i.e. 6-bolt mains, oil pump integrated onto crankshaft, etc), and then strangely seems to have borrowed even more of the older pushrod small block Ford layouts for the LS motors (i.e. head bolt pattern, bore spacing, and cooling passages on the LSx engines strangely match up to a small block Ford head).

The two main differences that remain between the modulars and a pushrod motor are:
1) Valvetrain moved up on top of the heads.
Benefits: Less parasitic drag, more stable valvetrain, higher revving capabilities, lighter weight components, less spring pressure, etc. In some respects easier to work on since valvetrain is on top of the motor. There are measureable advantages in reduced power consumption when using an overhead valvetrain vs. a cam in block valvetrain. This was probably one of Fords drivers to moving to an overhead cam strategy. Alot of racers have found that the stock 4-valve modular valvetrain doesn't require any modifications to extract large amounts of power from the engine.
Downsides: Increases overall size of the engine.
2) Multiple Valves: Ford offers the modular engine in 2, 3 and 4-valve. Typically more valves offer more flow and increased control to the air flow in the combustion chamber.
Benefits: really good flowing heads from the factory (especially 3 & 4 valve variants)
Downsides: More parts = more cost.

You can't go wrong with a Terminator or a Shelby GT500. Both are awesome engines and very easy to modify. Ford couldn't have made it any easier.
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Old 02-07-2007, 03:39 PM
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WOW, that was awsome. I would love to read more, I am just trying to get my feet wet, and get educated on the modular engine. I appreciate you taking the time to enlighten me. If you have any links to diagrams or pics that would be awsome. But dont kill yourself looking, I appreciate any info.
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